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20110716
20110716
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/11 what we have spent on the wars in afghanistan is close to $12 trillion. $275 million per day, every single day for 10 years. the total amount we have been spending annually in programs to better gauge the american people, to work with law enforcement or public safety, roughly 75 minutes. not to say that we will not spend what we can as a nation, investing in these things. but are we investing enough in this great asset that we have? dealing with the dangers that confront us? the fact is the terrorist threat has fundamentally changed over the last 10 years. the current and now the parting national terrorism director highlighted this as well. terrorists have essentially gone into smaller operations with increasingly homegrown dimensions, operating as lone wolves within two's and threes. central al qaeda, with the death of osama bin laden, is not able to orchestrate the large-scale conspiracies that we saw on 9/11, but it does mean that terrorism is more likely to come out smaller homes. without sophisticated conspiracies, you do not have the smoke signals and tripwires that help you o
at the borders, ports, afghanistan, iraq, police, and our departments by harnessing that american spirit so that we can become a more resilient nation. we are going to be dealing with this sort of threat for the perceivable future, for a couple of generations. you have summed it up very well. we need to confront the risk and overcome it. the executive committee in committee leaders will need to establish overarching policy for the national governors association. following that meeting, the committee will begin work to consolidate, revise, and align our policies for the priorities set by the executive committee. it is our hope that we will be but to build a consensus around key principles, like resilience, that can guide our advocacy efforts and better inform not only our federal lawmakers of the issues but do a better job of informing our citizens of the things that we can do as a free people to make our homeland more secure. the executive committee, we have agreed to allow all policies up for consideration for new policies and process, whatever that means, and we will discuss it at that ti
. one of the things that we are involved in his capacity building. we have officers in afghanistan, iraq, several others able to train and a buildup that capacity. if we are not doing enough, please get me the information. we are very interested in that type of build up, capacity building, so that it will help with your homeland and hours also. we are very much interested in that. on the invasive nista to talk about, anything that we do within dhs, we have an entity called civil rights, civil liberties. it reviews every activity that we undertake, that we are planning to undertake, and that we are looking to move toward so that when we do take action, we take into account the civil rights in civil liberties that are of the highest interests of all of us who have historically worked this type of effort. the amount of equipment out there is tremendous. it helps dramatically. we are very sensitive to that and base of this and want to make sure that we get the job done, making sure that the rights and liberties of our citizens are not in pain is. >> first of all, thank-you. we wish you the b
study that found that the cost of the war -- that cumulative cost of the wars in iraq and afghanistan will but did up to -- it will be up to $4.2 trillion. i think it is a very taft common -- apt comment. he said that there may be odd tricks ready to go. what will act on the fiscal side, when we had the stimulus package, we at $800 billion. and it was a scramble of what to do with the money. why is it that the fiscal authority what do not have a well thought out plan in place that if we hit this level of project -- unemployment, we have these projects ready. the economy would be much more about -- able to rebound. the stimulus, that was not just handouts. these were funds for projects. there's some projects that are short term, but on the infrastructure side, these are certainly large enough -- coda new york city and spend a few days there. you confided up potholes' that need fixing, which employ a lot of people. host: this is from london of twitter. -- linda a look twitter. guest: that speaks to the declining standard of living that we have in the unemployment market where people tak
and afghanistan, or raising the debt ceiling. i grant that, but we are talking about something that is profoundly troubling and disturbing. for millions of americans, it is also a necessary. i mean, i thought what we were meant to do is try to clear up problems here. 10 years ago, the telephone industry said they will clear up the problems because they make us look bad if we do not, therefore you could trust us to do it, and they did not. all i am saying is we are going to stick with this. the sec stated yesterday that they are seeking comment on whether a band third party billing -- banned third-party billing -- they have settlements, the ftc, but that this stuff that is already done, and that is an admission of guilt. i am not a lawyer, but that is the way i read it. anyway, in the near future, i plan to introduce, working with colleagues from both sides of the aisle, legislation that will put a side -- stop to this because i simply cannot find any grain of sense in us having to have a hearing like this. and and, to have -- and to have all of you, you have not gone off of the -- gotten out of t
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5